# SANS ISC

# threatpost.com

# Reddit netsec

# Krebs On Security

  • UK Man Gets Two Years in Jail for Running ‘Titanium Stresser’ Attack-for-Hire Service Tue, 25 Apr 2017 15:06:34 +0000
    A 20-year-old man from the United Kingdom was sentenced to two years in prison today after admitting to operating and selling access to "Titanium Stresser," a simple-to-use service that let paying customers launch crippling online attacks against Web sites and individual Internet users.Adam Mudd of Herfordshire, U.K. admitted to three counts of computer misuse connected with his creating and operating the attack service, also known as a "stresser" or "booter" tool. Services like Titanium Stresser coordinate so-called "distributed denial-of-service" or DDoS attacks that hurl huge barrages of junk data at a site in a bid to make it crash or become otherwise unreachable to legitimate visitors.
  • The Backstory Behind Carder Kingpin Roman Seleznev’s Record 27 Year Prison Sentence Mon, 24 Apr 2017 16:37:23 +0000
    Roman Seleznev, a 32-year-old Russian cybercriminal and prolific credit card thief, was sentenced Friday to 27 years in federal prison. That is a record punishment for hacking violations in the United States and by all accounts one designed to send a message to criminal hackers everywhere. But a close review of the case suggests that Seleznev's record sentence was severe in large part because the evidence against him was substantial and yet he declined to cooperate with prosecutors prior to his trial.The son of an influential Russian politician, Seleznev made international headlines in 2014 after he was captured while vacationing in The Maldives, a popular vacation spot for Russians and one that many Russian cybercriminals previously considered to be out of reach for western law enforcement agencies. He was whisked away to Guam briefly before being transported to Washington state to stand trial for computer hacking charges.
  • How Cybercrooks Put the Beatdown on My Beats Fri, 21 Apr 2017 19:29:36 +0000
    Last month Yours Truly got snookered by a too-good-to-be-true online scam in which some dirtball hijacked an Amazon merchant's account and used it to pimp steeply discounted electronics that he never intended to sell. Amazon refunded my money, and the legitimate seller never did figure out how his account was hacked. But such attacks are becoming more prevalent of late as crooks increasingly turn to online crimeware services that make it a cakewalk to cash out stolen passwords.

# Bruce Schneier's blog

# WIRED Threat Level

# exploit-db.com

# Securiteam