# SANS ISC

# threatpost.com

# Reddit netsec

# Krebs On Security

  • E-Verify’s “SSN Lock” is Nothing of the Sort Sat, 04 Jul 2020 22:24:14 +0000
    One of the most-read advice columns on this site is a 2018 piece called "Plant Your Flag, Mark Your Territory," which tried to impress upon readers the importance of creating accounts at websites like those at the Social Security Administration, the IRS and others before crooks do it for you. A key concept here is that these services only allow one account per Social Security number -- which for better or worse is the de facto national identifier in the United States. But KrebsOnSecurity recently discovered that this is not the case with all federal government sites built to help you manage your identity online.A reader who was recently the victim of unemployment insurance fraud said he was told he should create an account at the Department of Homeland Security's myE-Verify website, and place a lock on his Social Security number (SSN) to minimize the chances that ID thieves might abuse his identity for employment fraud in the future.
  • Ransomware Gangs Don’t Need PR Help Thu, 02 Jul 2020 01:10:45 +0000
    We've seen an ugly trend recently of tech news stories and cybersecurity firms trumpeting claims of ransomware attacks on companies large and small, apparently based on little more than the say-so of the ransomware gangs themselves. Such coverage is potentially quite harmful and plays deftly into the hands of organized crime.Often the rationale behind couching these events as newsworthy is that the attacks involve publicly traded companies or recognizable brands, and that investors and the public have a right to know. But absent any additional information from the victim company or their partners who may be affected by the attack, these kinds of stories and blog posts look a great deal like ambulance chasing and sensationalism.
  • COVID-19 ‘Breach Bubble’ Waiting to Pop? Tue, 30 Jun 2020 15:00:48 +0000
    The COVID-19 pandemic has made it harder for banks to trace the source of payment card data stolen from smaller, hacked online merchants. On the plus side, months of quarantine have massively decreased demand for account information that thieves buy and use to create physical counterfeit credit cards. But fraud experts say recent developments suggest both trends are about to change -- and likely for the worse.

# Bruce Schneier's blog

# TWITTER

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# WIRED Threat Level

# exploit-db.com

# Securiteam

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